Quantum Computing Is Going Commercial With the Potential to Disrupt Everything

Newsweek, 4/9/2017

IBM recently announced the IBM Q, which would be the first ever commercially available quantum computer. This is important because, if they fulfill their promise, quantum computers could potentially solve certain problems that traditional computers are simply not equipped to handle, allowing rapid developments in fields like medicine, pharmaceuticals, and transportation.

Dive With a Blue Whale in New Virtual-Reality Experience

Live Science, 3/16/2017

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles (NHMLA) collaborated with designers from Wevr to develop an oceanic underwater virtual reality (VR) experience for visitors. The VR gives visitors an opportunity to explore and interact with marine animals in their natural habitat, with the further goal of raising awareness about environmental issues that threaten ocean wildlife.

Bridging a Digital Divide That Leaves Schoolchildren Behind

The New York Times, 2/22/2017

The federal government is attempting to bridge the growing digital divide in low-income families by expanding a subsidy program, Lifeline, to include broadband Internet access. The Federal Communications Commission’s main goal in revising Lifeline is to address the increasing number of students without online access needed to complete schoolwork and homework. Other methods are being used to in an effort to patch this divide, such as wifi-equipped buses and school-provided wireless hotspots.

AI Predicts Autism From Infant Brain Scans

IEEE Spectrum, 2/15/2017

Researchers at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill have applied deep-learning algorithms to brain scans of children with a high risk of autism. Algorithms used three indicators, brain surface area, volume, and the gender of the child, to determine if 6- to 12-month-old infants were likely to develop autism. The results were 81% accurate at predicting later diagnosis. This improves over a 50% prediction rate from behavioral questionnaires.

Microsoft, Code.org Target Beginner Coders With Minecraft Programme

The Guardian, 12/9/2016

Mojang, Microsoft, and Code.org are teaming up to inspire a new generation of coders. The latest version of Code.org’s Hour of Code is a tutorial that allows beginner coders to create and share their own Minecraft game. Code.org’s goal is to provide “every student in every school…the opportunity to learn computer science” — in this case, through the highly popular Minecraft game.

Stanford Engineers Propose a Technology to Break the Net Neutrality Deadlock

Stanford News, 9/13/2016

The debate over net neutrality has largely focused on whether Internet service providers should allow some content providers to negotiate faster/cheaper access to their content for users. This article describes a prototyped system that would allow users to designate which content they want to special access to. Net neutrality has been seen as a digital divide issue; wide adoption of a user-choice system would change the parameters in that debate.