Startup Matroid Uses AI to Pluck Images From Streams of Video

MSN/Bloomberg News, 3/26/2017

Reza Zadeh, a professor at Stanford University, has begun an artificial intelligence (AI) startup called Matroid whose software can detect specific people or objects in video streams. The user specifies what they are looking for, using example images and video or preset options, and the algorithms find corresponding people or objects in different videos. This approach could prove useful for businesses, law enforcement, and political and social science.

Protecting Web Users’ Privacy

MIT News, 3/23/2017

MIT and Stanford University researchers are developing Splinter, an encryption system that hides online database queries. Splinter splits up and encrypts the request for data, sending subparts of the query to different database servers. The user’s computer organizes the returned data to determine the answer. The researchers seek to protect a user’s sensitive information as it travels through the Internet, and in some cases to keep the database systems themselves from knowing who’s searching for what.

Offline AI Revolution Awaits Smartphones

Phys.org/AFP, 2/27/2017

Phone manufacturers are attempting to make handsets operate offline by using artificial intelligence (AI) and faster processors. This could let handsets use data already stored to operate. Some companies are focusing on AI technologies that let handsets perform tasks before the user does. For example, Neura, a startup from┬áCalifornia uses an AI that takes data from user’s routine behaviors and then makes predictions on what the users next steps are. Handsets that operate offline and perform tasks before the user does become more helpful and user interactive.

Why We Should Not Know Our Own Passwords

The Conversation 3/9/2017

Elon University Professor Megan Squire looks into possible methods for protecting the data on your smartphone and social media accounts. The article focuses on potential searches by US border agents of people traveling from other countries. She explains several different methods of smartphone privacy protection, such as a system that uses your locations and habitual gesture patterns to identify you, or passwords even you don’t know.

Machine-Learning Algorithms Can Predict Suicide Risk More Readily Than Clinicians, Study Finds

Newsweek, 2/27/2017

Human clinicians are known not to be very accurate at predicting suicides, so researchers are developing machine-learning algorithms that use multiple factors to identify short-term suicide risk. Data scientists trained the algorithm on data from thousands of clinical records, from both non-fatal suicide cases and random patients. Accuracy was significantly better than studying only one risk factor at a time. Using such a system could aid clinicians in targeting at-risk patients and treating them early.

New Internet Security Device Launched to Safeguard Schools Against Child Abuse

Plymouth University, 2/20/2017

The University of Plymouth has developed ICAlert, an easy-to-install device that monitors network traffic and sends alerts if users try to access dangerous web content (such as child pornography or terrorist sites). They aim to make browsing safer for children and teens by providing the devices and software to schools at a low cost.

Toyota Funds AI Research to Build Autonomous Cars

Network World, 2/7/2017

Toyota is investing 50 million dollars and partnering with Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to develop artificial intelligence and robotics technology needed for advanced driver-assistance systems. While Toyota is not trying to develop a fully automated car, they note that incremental advances in such driver-aid systems could eventually lead to driverless smart cars.

A Chip Flaw Strips Away Hacking Protections for Millions of Devices

Wired, 2/14/2017

Dutch researchers have discovered a method of hacking commonly used microprocessors. Operating systems randomly assign the locations in memory where programs run, but this hack detects where a program is running, making bugs easier to exploit. If hackers figure out how to use this method, it could expose millions of computers to attacks — as it is impossible to fully fix with software updates alone.